Daily Punch 10-26-16 Distance Radio Education for Call of Cthulhu, 7th ed

Did you know back in the 1910-1930 there was an attempt to educate via radio waves?  http://iml.jou.ufl.edu/projects/spring01/declair/history.html

 

Let’s work that into Call of Cthulhu!

 

Distance Radio Education

Over the course of 1 month, a character may attempt to learn a skill via the standard education rules.  However, the character gets a bonus die when they attempt to roll over their current skill, thus it is harder for them to do so.  When a character succeeds on this check, they gain 1d4 points in that skill.  No character may gain more than 20 total points in a skill via this method.

 

Thoughts?

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Ring Side Report-Board Game Review of Mansions of Madness, 2nd ed.

Product-Mansions of Madness, 2nd ed.

Producer– Fantasy Flight Games

Price– $100 here https://www.amazon.com/Mansions-Madness-2nd-Board-Game/dp/B01J4NB6CO/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1477872904&sr=8-1&keywords=mansions+of+madness

Set-up/Play/Clean-up– 60-360 minutes (1-5 players)

Type- American

Depth-Medium

TL; DR-Great, but the price is a bit too steep! 89%

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Basics-  Can you survive the Mansions of Madness?  Step into this fully co-op board game as different investigators trying to uncover secrets best forgotten and lore never found!  The game is very easy to learn and basically teaches you how to play as you go. First, the players choose a scenario that they want to play from a computer, iPad, or android device.  That is the first thing to note here- you MUST have a device to play this game.  These scenarios range in difficulty from one to five with the intro scenario being a two.  After scenario selection, players then choose different character to be with different powers.  With that done, the game will then give the players different starting items and the players divide these up as they see fit.  Then the computer will layout the story and world telling the players where to put icons on the map, what map to build, and what other actions they can take.

Turns are fast and easy to do.  Each investigator takes their turn in whatever order they choose.  On a player’s turn, they do two actions.  These action range from moving two spaces, interaction with different icons on the map/computer, interacting with puzzles, casting spells, and attacking creatures.  Interaction with some icons expands the map and story.  Sometimes when you interact with an icon on the map, you have to roll a number of dice equal to one of your skills to discover something.  The dice are eight sided with blanks, clue icons (magnifying glasses), and elder signs.  Elder signs are always successes, but clue icons indicate you could succeed if you spend a clue token.  You only get clue tokens when you explore or uncover something which makes the clue economy extremely important!  Also, some skill checks will require multiple successes to to succeed.

Attacking is interesting as when you attack a creature, you must tell the game how you attack.  Then the computer randomly assigns you an attack method that depends on a skill roll.  Sometimes the skill is obvious like strength for a punch, but other times you might end up doing agility when you swing a hammer.  Again, sometimes you only need one success and other times you might need multiple.  If you succeed, the computer tells you how much damage you do to the target.

Spells vary from attacks and player buffs.  Each spell is a deck of cards where you draw one card and keep it face up in front of you.  When you cast the spell, the computer or the spell will tell you how to cast it, what skills to roll, and then it tells you to check the reverse side.  Some spells cause you to have to make another skill check to avoid damage or insanity and some just go off without a hitch.  After you cast your spell, you then shuffle the spell back into its deck and draw a new, random version of the spell.

Puzzles are one of the most intriguing additions to this game.  Unlike other games where players have to just roll a die to uncover the family mystery, in this game, the players have to do sliding tile puzzles, math puzzles, and even picture puzzles to uncover secrets.  All are done on the computer, so there’s no fuss or muss on setup and clean up.  

After all players have taken their turns, you tell the app or computer you are done, and the computer takes control, possibly spawning monsters, doing horrible events against some of the players, and advancing the story.  Monsters are the biggest threat as they move around the map directed by the app.  The app will tell you to move monsters and then attack players in their spaces.  Monsters’ attacks are resolved like player attacks.  The target of the attack rolls a skill.  Unlike player attacks, each success on this roll only removes one damage, not ALL damage.  After attacks are done, the app directs the players to make horror checks against the monster with the highest horror stat within three spaces.  This is another skill roll that only removes one insanity for each success the player achieves.

Damage is interesting in this game.  This game builds on Fantasy Flight’s other games with damage cards being both normal damage and special damage.  When you take damage or insanity, you get a card face down of the type.  Some cards and events will direct you to randomly flip one or more cards face up.  Now, you get special effects like being lame or agoraphobic.  When your damage equals your health, you discard all face down cards and gain a wounded condition card.  You can’t do the move action twice in a turn, and if you gain the wounded condition again, you are dead and out of the game!  If you gain insanity equal to your mental stat, you go crazy and gain a secret goal.  Now, you might not win by helping the other players but might only win if you start enough fires!  It’s a fun, fresh twist on the game.  

Once all the monsters are done, then the players take over again the the cycle continues until the players win or horror descends across the land!

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Mechanics-Overall, I like what I see here, but the computer part is a bit of a pain sometimes.  The hardest part is that the app is slow and there’s limited options on it.  If I attack with a 2×4, odds are I will see the same attack roll five times in a game.  That wasn’t bad in the first edition when I as the bag guy shuffled four cards for an attack, but now with the computer app, I’d like more options and descriptions.  The computer tends to slow down game play a bit.  However, I do like the general speed of human play.  A turn is quick as a human, and it is not overly complicated.  All the fun different things I want to do are easy to do, and I enjoy that immensely. 4.5/5

Theme-My wife and I can’t stop playing this.  It’s fun, and I feel like I’m in a Lovecraft story.  It’s even got a modified version of my favorite short story “The Shadow Over Innsmouth”!  Things feel right, the toys are nice, and the look is great.  5/5

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Instructions-Fantasy Flight Games has been doing this new version of game instructions where the simple instructions get a short book with pictures and the nitty gritty get their own book with an index.  That’s ok, but I end up needing to cross reference things, and it feels clunky.  Also, I feel some things were not explained as well as they could be, like how horror and monster attacks are not blocked with one success, but they need multiple.  Those details are pretty important, and I think it wasn’t emphasized enough.  I got the feeling of missing key instructions until later a few times playing this game.  4.25/5

Execution-Ok, here is the bitter pill to swallow-this game is not worth $100.  I like what’s here, but I feel I got more from the first edition than the second.  Sure the app is nice, but I got more cards in the first edition, more books, and just more stuff.  Now, I get more generic cardboard, monsters, and the app.  What makes me give this a “4” is the backwards compatibility of the starter box.  Fantasy Flight was a class act by giving me a conversion kit to get my old stuff into the new.  I think what I get here is fair for $80, but for the $100 it went for, maybe that’s a bit much.  Everything is great, but maybe not that good.  If you want to to make that choice for yourselves, check out our unboxing here https://youtu.be/HK3Mb369xoA  4/5

Summary-I like this game, but it’s a game that you have to invest in.  What’s here is good, but too expensive.  If you NEED your Cthulhu fix, then this is a great continuation of the Arkham Horror games from Fantasy Flight Games.  It’s a solid set with nice monsters, good cardboard, great stories, and easy mechanics.  But, if you can’t drop the equivalent of a small car payment on this box, you might want to wait till this thing goes on sale.  It’s a great game, but at this price, I’d like a bit more in the app, the box, and the game overall.  That said, I’m still glad bought it, and I plan to buy the expansions.  So, it’s gotta be good. 89%

Daily Punch 10-25-16 Low Focus negative quality for Shadowrun 5e

If you can split the pot, how about taking a penalty for doing it!

 

Low Focus_____________
Bonus Karma: 5 or 10 karma
Some people can talk, walk, and chew bubble gum at the same time.   You… not so much.  When you have to split a dice pool for an action, you take a -1 (5 karma) or -2(10 karma) penalty to each separate dice pool when you assemble the pool.  This penalty stacks with all other penalties you have for the roll.

 

Thoughts?

Daily Punch 10-24-16 Split the Pot positive quality for Shadowrun 5e

When you shoot two target or punch two guys, you have to split it as equally as you can.  Let’s work on that…

 

 

Split the Pot______________
Cost: 10 karma
Sometimes balance is for suckers!  When you do an action that requires you to split your dice pool, you may elect to move up to half of the dice from any pool(s) and move them to other dice pool(s) of your choice.  You must leave at least one die in each pool.

 

Thoughts?

Ring Side Report- RPG Review of Call of Cthulhu 7th Edition

 

ProductCall of Cthulhu 7th Edition

System-Call of Cthulhu

Producer-Chaosium

Price– $30.00 here http://www.drivethrurpg.com/product/150997/Call-of-Cthulhu-7th-Edition–Keepers-Rulebook?affiliate_id=658618

TL; DR-Great RPG with an ok execution.  85%

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Basics– ia ia cthulhu fhtagn! Call of Cthulhu is back with the newest edition of the classic horror RPG.  It’s got a new update, a new hardcover, and a new look.  Let’s see How it stacks up to the current stack of other RPGS!

Mechanics or Crunch-Let’s break this one down into a few different areas.

 

Base Mechanics- This is a classic percentile dice based game.  Much like any other RPG, when you are told you need to roll the dice, you roll percentile dice (d100).  The goal is to roll under your skill or ability.  An example would be trying to read an ancient Egyptian manuscript.  You would see if you have the skill Language(Ancient Egyptian).  If you do, you can roll your d100.  If you roll under, you roll succeed.  It’s quick and simple.

 

Additions that are new to the system (or at least to me)-CoC 7th edition my first edition of Call of Cthulhu .  What this system does instead of modifying your percentage in a skill or ability like other systems is the use of ½ and ⅕ skills.  If the test is difficult, you may be asked to roll under ½ your skill.  If the task is amazingly difficult, then you have to roll under ⅕.  Again, it’s a quick and easy way of executing difficulty .

 

Pushing–  Let’s say you fail, but you want to try again.  You want to steal a wallet.  You fail once, but you think you could do it again.  This is called a push.  When you push, you get to reroll a skill.  Failing to steal the wallet is bad as you might get caught.  BUT, if you push, you might get the wallet and not get caught.  HOWEVER, if you push and fail, then it get really bad.  Maybe instead of pushing you off as a harmless carpetbagger, the target of the theft calls the cops and starts swinging immediately instead of just yelling loudly.  It’s a great addition to the risk and reward of Call of Cthulhu.  Also note-you may never push in combat.  Speaking of which….

 

Combat-Combat is quick. There is no initiative.  You have an statistic called dexterity (dex).  Combat resolves from high to low dex.  Each turn you can move a bit and then do one action.  Just like the base mechanic it’s roll under.  If I want to attack, I roll under an attack skill, and the target tries to roll under a dodge or counter attack skill.  If we both succeed , then we look if both are under ½.  If that happens, we check to see if we’re under ⅕.  If that happens, the defender wins.  Each character only has a few hit points and damage adds up quickly, so combat is deadly fast!  I love quick and efficient systems.

 

Bonus and Penalty Dice- Many other percentile based systems have modifiers you add or subtract from a skill.  Call of Cthulhu 7ed doesn’t do this, but It uses something similar to DnD 5th edition advantage system with bonus and penalty dice.  When a situation is particularly good like doing research on ancient Egyptian mythology in at the University of Cairo’s Egyptology department library, you would get an extra d10 die.  You roll this die along with your other percentile die and use the lower of the 10 position dice.  Penalty dice work exactly the opposite.  Say you are trying to decipher a deep one script while riding across the countryside in the dark avoiding horrors from beyond time and space, you get an extra d10 die.  Now, you get the higher of the two dice as you have a harder time doing the skill.  Of all the things I’ve seen develop in the RPG world lately, this is one of my favorites.

 

Money-Here is a weird one.  Characters don’t have cash, per se, they have a credit rating.  This is a rough estimate of how much they can spend at any given time.  You walk into a shop and want to buy something and it’s under your credit rating expenses in a  day, you just get it.  If it’s massively above your credit rating, then you might lose some credit rating at the end of the adventure!

 

Advancement-Every session, a character marks all the skills they use and succeed at.  At the end of every session, the character makes  single attempt to roll over their current skill in that task.  If they do, then they gain 1d10 extra points in that skill.  In addition, characters can also attend school and do a test over their skills and advance much the same as above.

 

Sanity-It wouldn’t be Lovecraft without someone going mad!  When you see something scary or learn a spell, you make a sanity roll.  Sanity is like any other skill that you roll under.  If you roll under, you lose less sanity.  If you roll above, you lose more.  Both events make it harder to deal with in the future!  Lose all your sanity and you go insane!

 

Magic-Magic exists, but it comes with a cost.  Spells use skills like any other action, and each spell uses magic points.  When you run out of magic points, you start to lose hit points.  To cast a roll, a character has to succeed at a ⅕ power roll.  From then on, the character doesn’t have to make a check to cast the spell.  Again, it’s a sleek and easy system.

 

Summary-  Overall, I like what I see here.  It’s sleek, easy to run, and more important, easy to play.  Players are not buried under a mountain of information at the start of the game.  You want to do X.  If X could fail, then you roll.  If you do fail maybe you can push and succeed or things get really hairy.  Call of Cthulhu has an advantage-like system that makes life easy instead of having to fiddle with different modifiers.  Money is easy to handle, and advancement is a snap.  I like what I see here.  My only issue is diversity and options.  You really only advance in things you succeed at.  If I want to learn to speak Aramaic, I have to know it at the start of the campaign.  I don’t freely learn that unless I train which might not happen.  My second problem is character options.  Sure there are lots of cool options, but beyond character generation, character are more flung into situation and can’t really build in a direction.  It feels a bit swingy to me, but that also enhances the helpless feeling from Lovecraft.  These are minor complaints, but overall, it’s a good system.  4.5/5

 

Theme or Fluff-The theme of this game is on point.  This is the 7th edition of the game, so they know how to make a good story with Lovecraftian themes.  In general, you CAN’T hack and shoot your way out of a confrontation with the horrors beyond time.  The book has lots of help to get new investigators into the game quickly and efficiently.  There are even two fully fleshed out adventures that the keeper(GM for this game) can throw at the players to get them playing the day you get the book.  4.75/5

Execution-This is the one area where I have some significant problems.  Things are written relatively well, and the art is good.  But, the layout of the book is a problem.  The PDF is hyperlinked, but finding what you need is still a pain.  The book has over over 300 pages, and I still have problems every time trying to find the credit rating table to figure out how much my players can spend at any given time.  That is a significant problem!  3.5/5

Summary-This is a great system that the layout of the book hurts a bit.  I love the way the system works in general, but wish that it had just a bit more options for the players during the game.  The  theme is on point, and I love what here.  My major problem is the book’s design.  I can’t find what I need when I need it.  I will admit, that might be a problem from me not having much experience, but if a new keeper is having problems, then that’s bad no matter what.  However, if you can push through some problems with using the book, you can easily fall in love with this horror RPG.   85%

Daily Punch 10-19-16 Black Powder Witch archetype for Pathfinder

How about we continue the idea of a Witch Gun in one more game..

 

Black Powder Witch

Some witches toil over cauldrons, but you work clockwork with ease.  You keep the more esoteric parts of the witch lifestyle, but you’ve added more modern flare with the acceptance of clockwork, gears, and powder.  You’re spells make you dangerous, but  Alkenstar makes you deadly.

Patron: A Black Powder Witch cannot choose a patron whose interests or theme opposes that of technology.

Spells

A Black Powder Witch replaces some of her patron spells with the following: 2nd—prismatic sphere, 4th—wood shape, 6th—stone shape, 8th—minor creation, 10th—fabricate, 12th—major creation, 14th—mage’s magnificent mansion, 16th—statue, 18th—wooden phalanx.

Witch Gun (Sp)

A Black Powder Witch loses the ability to cast cantrips.  The witch gains Exotic Weapon Proficiency (firearms) and Gunsmithing as bonus feats.  A Black Powder Witch  also gains one of the following firearms of her choice: blunderbuss, musket, or pistol. Her starting weapon is battered, and only she knows how to use it properly. All other creatures treat her gun as if it had the broken condition.

As a spell-like ability as a standard action, a Black Powder Witch can cast a hex when she fires a firearm.  The target makes all saves against the hex as normal, but the witch must strike the target and do damage for the hex to take effect.  If the attack misses or fails to do damage, then the target does not have to make a save against the hex.  The ability modified hex and cantrips.

Construct empathy(Ex)

A Black Powder Witch must select a minor construct familiar when selecting her familiar.  This ability modifies Witch Familiar.

Minor Clockwork Familiar CR 1/5

N Tiny construct (clockwork)
Init +2; Senses darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision; Perception +5

DEFENSE

AC 16, touch 14, flat-footed 14 (+2 Dex, +2 natural, +2size)
hp 5 (1d10)
Fort +0, Ref +2, Will +1
DR 1/adamantine; Immune construct traits;
Weaknesses vulnerable to electricity

OFFENSE

Speed 30 ft., fly 50 ft. (perfect)
Melee bite +3 (1d3 electricity)

STATISTICS

Str 10, Dex 14, Con 10, Int 11, Wis 13, Cha 3
Base Atk +1; CMB +1; CMD 14
Skills Fly +5, Perception +4, Stealth +5
Languages Common

SA Familiar

Familiar

The master of a minor clockwork familiar gains DR 1/adamantine.

 

Loss of Nature(Ex)

A Black Powder Witch loses knowledge(nature) as a class skill but gains knowledge (engineering).

 

 

Thoughts?